Author: John Outcalt (1925)

CHARLES M. HYATT

That adverse conditions build up strong characters and break down the weak is a truism emphasized in the life of Charles Hyatt. Fortune smiled but little on
his boyhood years; but in the difficult and somewhat bitter school of experience, his character was formed, his mind developed and habits of self reliance inculcated.

He was born in Indiana, on September 14, 1863. His father, Witt Hyatt, was a soldier in the Civil War, and died at Nashville, Tenn., leaving five children ranging from the age of four to seventeen. The mother, Margaret (Hughes) Hyatt was born in Indiana and bravely tried to keep the family together after her
husband's death, but finally succumbed and left the son, Charles M., an orphan at the age of twelve. When only thirteen years of age he had to start out and make his own living working on farms round about for four dollars a month at first, then six dollars and eight dollars by the time he was sixteen; when he
was seventeen he went to western Missouri, where he received sixteen dollars a month. In 1886 he went to Nevada and worked in and around Reno until 1889, when he secured a position with Senator Newlands and worked for him twenty-five years.

On September 17, 1885, Charles M. Hyatt married Miss Addie Ramsey, the daughter of William and Louisa (McPeak) Ramsey. Her mother was a native of Ohio, and died in Missouri about 1904 at the age of seventy-seven. Her father was born in Illinois and died in Kansas at the age of eighty-five. There were five children of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Hyatt: Edna, married Fred Saxer and resides in San Diego; Frank, lives in the Hilmar Colony, he married Violet Calvin and they have one child; Ethel, married Ed. Ryder and resides in Oakland, and has one child; Charles, married Miss Bertha Armstrong of the Hilmar Colony and is a rancher; and Lou, at home.

In 1908 Mr. Hyatt made an extensive tour looking for a place to invest the money he had saved in thirty-five years of steady and arduous service. He
finally found the Hilmar Colony and finding conditions to suit him, bought twenty acres for which he paid $92.50 an acre. It is a fine ranch and very valuable, being situated immediately east of the Union high school building at Irwin, and he improved it with a comfortable living-house, barn and other buildings and planted alfalfa and fruit, etc. Mr. Hyatt died on January 3, 1925, and was buried in the Turlock Cemetery. He was a man of excellent judgment and business acumen and was well posted on current events and voted for the candidates and principles which were for the best interests of the majority. He was generous, fair and public spirited and his death marks a real loss to the community.

Additional Comments:
From:

HISTORY OF
MERCED COUNTY
CALIFORNIA
WITH A
Biographical Review
OF
The Leading Men and Women of the County Who Have Been
Identified with Its Growth and Development
from the Early Days to the Present

HISTORY BY
JOHN OUTCALT

ILLUSTRATED COMPLETE IN ONE VOLUME
HISTORIC RECORD COMPANY
LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA
1925

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Joy Fisher